Campaign for your Rights Workshop – Guilford, CT

Gun control groups are marching on. They are using anti-gun politicians to infringe on our rights. The only way to stop attacks on the 2nd Amendment is to help Pro2A candidates win in 2018. While most gun owners wish to be left alone, the anti-gun crowd will not cease in their efforts.

CCDL members are invited to participate in this FREE workshop to gain the necessary knowledge to become active in fighting the anti-gun machine.

Where: Guilford Sportsmen’s Association501 Hart Road, Guilford, CT  06437
When: Saturday, June 23th from 11:00am until 1:00pm
Agenda:

  • Basics of Campaign Strategies
  • Importance of Your Involvement
  • What Gun Control Groups and sympathizers are doing
  • Examples of Effective Victories from Our Side
  • Q&A

2A candidates need our help!

One of the biggest concerns many legislators have is who will be there to help them win re-election if they vote with us. Too often we hear about how gun-grabbing politicians have people working on their campaigns. If we are going to stop this, like it or not we need to become more political than we have been in the past. While we have a positive track record on some campaigns, we will need more successes.

Please join us in helping the Pro2A movement win in 2018. RSVP today (Name and Town) via email to membership@ccdl.us or phone: 240-320-7075
Help good candidates win this year.

Campaign for your Rights Workshop – Monroe, CT

Gun control groups are marching on. They are using anti-gun politicians to infringe on our rights. The only way to stop attacks on the 2nd Amendment is to help Pro2A candidates win in 2018. While most gun owners wish to be left alone, the anti-gun crowd will not cease in their efforts.

CCDL members are invited to participate in this FREE workshop to gain the necessary knowledge to become active in fighting the anti-gun machine.

Where: Fairfield County Fish & Game310 Hammertown Rd, Monroe, CT 06468
When: Saturday, June 9th from 11:00am until 1:00pm
Agenda:

  • Basics of Campaign Strategies
  • Importance of Your Involvement
  • What Gun Control Groups and sympathizers are doing
  • Examples of Effective Victories from Our Side
  • Q&A

2A candidates need our help!

One of the biggest concerns many legislators have is who will be there to help them win re-election if they vote with us. Too often we hear about how gun-grabbing politicians have people working on their campaigns. If we are going to stop this, like it or not we need to become more political than we have been in the past. While we have a positive track record on some campaigns, we will need more successes.

Please join us in helping the Pro2A movement win in 2018. RSVP today (Name and Town) via email to membership@ccdl.us or phone: 240-320-7075
Help good candidates win this year.

Last Day To Change Party Affiliation

Today, May 14, is the last day to change your party affiliation to vote in the state primary elections on August 14th.

You do not need to register with a political party to vote in the November general elections. However, you must be a member of a political party in order to vote in that party’s August primary. Primary elections determine what candidate will represent the political party in the general election.

So, say you are a Democrat or Libertarian gun owner, and you want to be able to vote in the Republican primary and help select a strong progun candidate to run in the November general election. Today is the last day to switch your party affiliation to Republican for the primary. You can always change back after the elections, and just because you register for one party doesn’t mean you have to vote for that party in the general elections. It just gives you the opportunity to vote in that party’s primary election.

Not sure if you are registered with a party? Use Connecticut’s voter registration lookup tool to check whether you are already registered with a party.

To register with a political party, complete a new Voter Registration and indicate your party choice in section 9.

To change your party registration, complete a new Voter Registration and indicate your new choice in section 9.
REMEMBER: There is a 3 month waiting period to change from one party to another. If you switch after today, you won’t be able to vote in the primary. This does not apply when switching from unaffiliated to party membership.

What is an unaffiliated voter?
Unaffiliated is the term used to refer to voters who are not registered with a political party. This term is used instead of referring to these voters as independent to avoid confusion with the Independent Party, which is an established political party. If you write Independent in section 9 of your Voter Registration, you will be registered as a member of the Independent Party. Unaffiliated voters have until 5 days before the primary to declare a party by mail. They can also declare a party in person up until 12 noon on the last business day before the primary.

May Meeting Reminder – Member Updates

CCDL Member Meeting – May 8th

CCDL holds its monthly general membership meeting at 7:00pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at the Elks Lodge in Middletown, CT. Our next meeting is May 8th. All CCDL members are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Meeting Agenda:

Avoid the wait and shipping fees! The full selection of CCDL merchandise is always for sale at our meetings, including many items not sold on our website.


GOP Convention Endorsements

The Connecticut Citizens Defense League Executive Committee last week announced a list of endorsed and preferred candidates ahead of the May 2018 GOP convention. This is to advise convention delegates which candidates we feel are strongest on issues CCDL cares about.
CCDL will revisit candidate endorsements after the May conventions.

List of GOP Convention Endorsements


End of 2018 Legislative Session Winding Down

As of this email, the ‘Bumpstock Bill’ HB5542 was passed in the House by a vote of 114 to 35 and with the session winding down, there is no word on whether or not the bill will get called for a vote in the Senate. The last day of the legislative session is May 9th.

Here is a list of State Reps that voted to oppose the Bump Stock Bill: Reps Who Voted With Us

The ‘Ghost Gun Bill’ HB5540 has yet to be called in the House, and if it were to pass, it would then also need to move to the Senate for a vote.

The ‘Firearms in State Parks Bill’ HB5539 Has also yet to be called by the House. That bill would also need to be called by the senate if it were to pass.

Even though we are nearing the end of the session, a lot can happen as last-minute deals are made, but we are hoping that our pro 2A favorable legislators can run out the clock on these gun control bills.

CCDL will do our best to keep our members up to date by the minute with these last remaining days of the legislative session. For the fastest minute by minute updates, please make sure that you subscribe to our blog, Facebook page, and Twitter. Fast moving information and in-between updates usually end up there first.


CCDL Campaign Workshops for 2018

Dates are being set for at least 2 Saturdays in June. These workshops will give the education needed for 2nd Amendment supporters to actively engage in 2018 elections. Your involvement in the 2018 elections is our biggest asset to help beat gun-grabbing politicians who are intent on stripping your rights.

This is ground level hands-on action that is necessary to help keep good legislators in office, and help new ones get elected. Anti-gun forces are lined up to help gun control type candidates that will surely hurt our right to keep and bear arms. Please do not miss these workshops when they are announced. CCDL NEEDS YOU!
Topics covered will include:

  • Importance of Involvement
  • Basics of Campaign Strategies
  • What the Other Side is Doing
  • Examples of Victories
  • Q&A

Dates will be announced soon

Public Testimony Tips

With a public hearing on gun bills set for this Friday, it’s time to repost our tips for preparing public testimony for the legislature – written and in person.

Legislative Testimony “Tip Sheet” originally published on 1/25/2013

Overview:

Testifying (in person or written testimony) may seem like a daunting task at first. Use this “tip sheet” to help you as you prepare for your testimony. Regardless of how you testify (in person or written) many items are still the same. However, if you plan to submit written testimony AND testify in person, you do not need to stick to your written testimony. This is particularly helpful if you have knowledge of a particular subject that was not answered in previous testimony.

Keep all your testimony brief and “stick to the facts”. It is also helpful if you personalize your written testimony and explain how a bill will affect you. This also makes it easier for you to not repeat the same facts and testimony of previous speakers. If your written testimony is essentially the same as previous speakers, tell the committee you agree with previous speakers and you are available to answer any questions.

Regardless of how you testify, the following should always be included:

  • Your name
  • Where you’re from (city/state)
  • State whether you support or oppose the bill
  • Use the bill number and title of the bill (EX: HB 1234 An Act Concerning Firearms)
  • Summarize your recommendation first and then add any needed explanation
  • Restate your position on the bill
  • Thank the legislators for their time and consideration of your position. Provide contact information and offer to answer any questions.
  • BE RESPECTFUL—never use derogatory names or threaten/antagonize

If you are testifying in person, here are a few more tips:

  • Each committee has a different operating procedure, however most only allow 3 minutes of testimony. You will be timed, and a buzzer or bell will sound once your time is up. If you hear that sound, please wrap it up as soon as you can. CAVEAT: If at the end of the 3 minutes, a legislator asks you a question, you may continue to speak to answer that question. However, please be respectful of time and try not to be excessive.
  • If you cannot cover all the information in the required 3 minutes, add it to the written testimony you submitted and note to the legislators that there is more you provided in writing
  • Rehearse your testimony. Anticipate questions and answers to those questions
  • If you DO NOT know the answer to a question, say so! Offer to get the correct information to the legislator or their aid as soon as possible.
  • Arrive and sign up early to testify.
  • Bring enough copies of your testimony. This is often stated when a hearing will take place. Bring a few extra copies so you have a copy to go over and practice before you speak. Not all committees allow testimony to be submitted electronically.
  • Dress appropriately for testimony. Business dress or business casual is preferred. No cammo, Printed T-shirts, etc. No hats. Your testimony may be televised.
  • Make sure cell phones are “muted” or turned off
  • Adjust and speak directly into the microphone. You should be no more than six inches from the microphone.
  • Avoid technical jargon. Many legislators are not familiar with terms and acronyms.
  • Plan to spend the entire day at the legislature. You may not have to, but depending on how testimony is organized (it could be by lottery) you may be there all day. Make sure plans are made with babysitters and employers ahead of time. It’s not uncommon for hearings to go through the evening hours.
  • Bring food or snacks (there is a cafeteria and auxiliary store).
  • DO NOT threaten or antagonize or argue with the legislators
  • DO NOT bring weapons into the legislature.
  • DO NOT clap, cheer or jeer during testimony. It only slows down the process and just doesn’t make us look good. Respect is key here.

If you have the time, make a visit to the Legislative Office Building (LOB) ahead of time and sit in on a hearing. This will give you a good idea of what to expect. Many of the hearings are also online at www.ct-n.com (The CT Network)

Statistics
Avoid using outdated statistics. Also, make sure your sources are valid. I.e. if a legislator sees you reference for a statistic is a known biased “news” (Fox, MSNBC, Breitbart, etc.) outlet, it may be called into question (perceived bias). There are some GREAT resources for firearms statistics that help you avoid a perceived bias.

  • Gunfacts.info – www.gunfacts.info This site has a downloadable book (available for purchase as well). GREAT information. All statistics are referenced in footnotes of every page.
  • FBI Crime Statistics – http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/crimestats Data here is hard for “the other side” to refute as it comes straight from the FBI.
  • Gun Cite – http://www.guncite.com/ – Not always up to date, but good source of ideas.
  • CT Pistol Permit Issues – www.ctpistolpermitissues.com – More information specific to Connecticut. Defensive firearms use, Office of Legislative Research Reports, pivotal state, federal and supreme court cases and permit procedure information.

Other useful resources

  • Connecticut Citizens Defense League – www.ccdl.us – keep current on issues affecting Connecticut.
    CCDL also maintains an active presence regarding legislative efforts and informs members as soon as information is made available. CCDL is free to join and email lists are not shared with any other source.
  • NRA-ILA – National Rifle Association, Institute for Legislative Action – www.nraila.org – NRA-ILA maintains a large web site with information on legislative issues around the nation.
  • Connecticut General Assembly – www.cga.ct.gov – Lookup feature to find who your legislators are and how to contact them. Bill tracking – this allows you to read the language and any updates that may have been made. Hearing dates and times and any specific information for that hearing day (How many copies of testimony, etc.).

Books:

  • More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws, Third Edition, John R. Lott Jr. (Author) [Paperback] [Kindle] John R. Lott Jr. (Author)

Repost – Blog Updates By Email

Today is the start of the 2018 State Legislative Session.

We already know there will be proposals to ban “bump stocks” (along with anything that might make a gun cycle faster than stock), making or assembling your own gun from parts, and another attempt at $300 permit fees.

Like we’ve done in the past, I’m going to repeat a few old blog posts for the new members and also as a refresher for the older members. First up is how to subscribe to these blog updates by email.

CCDL usually sends out 1-2 emails a month to keep our members updated on what’s going on with the organization and our gun rights. With the political climate the way it is, things sometimes happen far too fast to wait for a monthly email. A good way to stay up to date with everything happening is to subscribe to this blog. Just look down the right side of the blog home page (http://ccdl.us/blog/) and you will see a place to enter your email address. It looks like this:

Simply enter your email address and press the subscribe button.
You will then get a confirmation email from “CCDL Blog”. Open that email and press the Confirm Follow button. Now you will get an email when there is a new post here. Don’t worry, if you ever change your mind, every email has a link to unsubscribe.

One last thing, if you are active on Facebook, besides the Official CCDL page, there is also a CCDL discussion group. It’s a good place to interact with fellow CCDL members.

Free Legislative Workshops

The 2017 legislative session is well under way. As in years past, gun owners will be needed to support or oppose various proposed laws related to your rights.

CCDL invites all that are interested in preserving our 2nd Amendment rights in Connecticut to attend one of our FREE workshops. These workshops are designed to educate gun owners about legislative action.

At these FREE workshops you will learn:

  • Learn about the legislative process and any pending gun bills
  • Tips for communicating with your legislators
  • How to prepare written testimony
  • How to submit your testimony
  • How to testify at a public hearing effectively
  • How to track gun bills
  • How to become proactive and vigilant
  • Much more!

These events are free and open to CCDL members and anyone who supports our right to bear arms. Bring you friends!

Host: New Haven Sportsman’s Club
Date: Saturday, January 21, 2017
Time: 10:00am -12:00pm
Location: New Haven Sportsman’s Club
4158 Durham Rd, Guilford, CT

Host: Windsor Marksmen’s Association
Date: Wednesday, February 15, 2017
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Location: Suffield VFW Post 9544
972 Sheldon ST, Suffield, CT
(downstairs meeting hall)

For more information, email Ray Bevis: legislative@ccdl.us

Resources For Monday’s Public Hearing

We hope ALL of you will be attending or at least submitting written testimony for Monday’s public hearing. The antigun groups are mobilizing their members, it is vitally important we make our voices heard!
CCDL Legislative Coordinator Ray Bevis has put together the following resources to help you out. If you have any questions, you may email Ray at legislative@ccdl.us

Resource Sheet for:

2016 – H.B. No. 5054 AN ACT PROTECTING VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

2016 – H.B. No. 5597 AN ACT PROTECTING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VICTIMS SEEKING RESTRAINING ORDERS

2016 – H.B. No. 5623 AN ACT CONCERNING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING

 Some Points to Raise:

  • Try not using the word victim, instead try using applicant or applicant of the ex parte restraining order.
  • Try referring to the alleged attacker as the respondent or subject.
  • Taking away a person’s natural right of protection without a hearing, without a criminal charges, without a police report, without due process.
  • This is just a gun grabbing law.
  • For an ex parte application, a judge cannot determine a fair preponderance of the evidence on the basis of one biased affidavit.
  • Connecticut already has a seizure of firearm provision for persons posing a risk of injury to self or others under 29-38c – “Seizure of firearms of person posing risk of imminent personal injury to self or others”.
  • Connecticut already has a seizure of firearm provision for when a peace officer determines that a family violence crime has been committed under 46b-38b.
  • Many states, including Connecticut, already prohibit people with violent misdemeanor convictions from acquiring or possessing firearms or ammunition, regardless of the offender’s relationship to the victim.
  • Applicants of temporary restraining orders commonly apply for them days and sometimes weeks after the alleged incident happened and often without a police report filed.
  • Alleged domestic violence victims are not required to report to the police in order to obtain a restraining order.
  • Rights are striped without a chance to be heard and without a police report.
  • If a crime is serious enough to cause an individual to lose a fundamental constitutional right, then that crime should be serious enough for a police investigation.
  • Police are trained to administer the Lethality Risk Assessment, which is the evidence-based instrument that’s used to identify domestic violence victims who are at heightened risk of injury or worse.
  • In 2014, 45% of all ex parte temporary restraining orders were found not to be valid after the hearing.
  • In 2015, 37% of all ex parte temporary restraining orders were found not to be valid after the hearing.

Background Information


Ex parte: /ˌɛks ˈpɑrtiː/ is a Latin legal term meaning “from (by or for) [the/a] party”. An ex parte decision is one decided by a judge without requiring all of the parties to the controversy to be present.

Protective / Restraining Order Glossary

Other References & Resources

Firearm possession & domestic violence restraining orders report from OLR:

CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT:

THE FAMILY VIOLENCE ARRESTS ANNUAL REPORT FOR 2014 with great visual charts.

Hands, fists, feet were the most commonly used weapon to commit the murder used in 38 percent of the incidents

In only two incidents was there either an active or expired Court Order of Protection

In the 24 family violence homicides, hands, fists, feet were the most common weapon, nine (38%). Other weapons included knives, eight (33%) and firearms, seven (29%).

2014 Findings & Recommendations Connecticut Domestic Violence Fatality Review Committee

Letter to Gov. Malloy from Rachel M. Baird, Attorney

Regarding Connecticut Ex Parte Restraining Orders, Due Process, and Amending the Laws to Discourage Abuse of Process and Protect Victims of Domestic Violence.

Connecticut judicial branch statistics

Connecticut judicial branch statistics for restraining orders

CT Uniform Crime Reports: Publications & Statistics

U.S. Government’s open data

Here you will find data, tools, and resources to conduct research, develop web and mobile applications, design data visualizations, and more.

Restraining Orders Out of Control by Gregory A. Hession, J.D. 2008

Connecticut Law About Domestic Violence

New Open Carry Memorandum

The state just issued an new memorandum concerning open carry.
Hopefully this clarifies the issue if open carry is legal (with a permit), and if you need to show your permit to the police if asked.
Here is the first page and a half, out of six pages:

open carry memo 2-2016

Now please go and read the whole thing. It covers how they may “request” your permit, and how they might then use things against you.

You may read the full memorandum and download a copy here:
open-carry-memo-feb-2016 (pdf)

Blog Updates Via Email

CCDL is the best resource there is to stay up-to-date on pending gun legislation and issues here in Connecticut. For the newer members, we’ll repeat a few older posts to help you get the most from this resource.

CCDL usually sends out 1-2 emails a month to keep our members updated on what’s going on with the organization and our gun rights. With the political climate the way it is, things sometimes happen far too fast to wait for a monthly email. A good way to stay up to date with everything happening is to subscribe to this blog. Just look down the right side of the blog home page (http://ccdl.us/blog/) and you will see a place to enter your email address. It looks like this:

Simply enter your email address and press the subscribe button.
You will then get a confirmation email from “CCDL Blog”. Open that email and press the Confirm Follow button. Now you will get an email when there is a new post here. Don’t worry, if you ever change your mind, every email has a link to unsubscribe.

One last thing, if you are active on Facebook, besides the Official CCDL page, there is also a CCDL discussion group. It’s a good place to interact with fellow CCDL members.